Protecting Women’s Rights in a Religious “Right” World

Threats to women’s reproductive rights have been making headlines for the past few years but women received a small victory yesterday when the Obama administration announced that most employers will have to provide contraceptives at no cost to their employees.


Threats to women’s reproductive rights have been making headlines for the past few years but women received a small victory yesterday when the Obama administration announced that most employers will have to provide contraceptives at no cost to their employees.

While this is a victory to women’s reproductive rights, there are still a few things women’s rights activists need to consider. First, there is still a loophole for religious nonprofits. According to ThinkProgress.org, “Only houses of worship and other religious nonprofits that primarily employ and serve people of the same faith will be exempt.” For women like me, who used to work for a religious nonprofit, this may not be terrible news since abstinence-only and purity teachings are widespread. However, married women who may not want to have children immediately, or at all, may still have trouble accessing contraceptives due to the financial cost. And due to the fact that many religious nonprofits and houses of worship still hold the belief that women are to be mothers first, and human beings second.

Second, and perhaps most importantly, are the Roman Catholic bishops who are behind the lobbying that’s threatening women’s access to abortions and contraceptives. These men are simply not going away, nor will they stop lobbying just because they were defeated by the Obama Administration on this small matter. Laura Bassett writes in The Huffington Post

But the erosion of women’s rights didn’t begin with the GOP takeover. President Barack Obama’s health care reform law contained some of the most restrictive abortion language seen in decades.

Lift the curtain, and behind the assault was the conference of bishops.

“It is a very effective lobby, unfortunately, and now they have an ally in the Republican majority because both groups find this a means by which to fight women’s health issues in general,” said Rep. Lois Capps (D-Calif.), a member of the House Pro-Choice Caucus. “The bishops carry a lot of clout.”

“We consider the two biggest opponents on the other side the Catholic bishops and National Right to Life,” said Donna Crane, policy director of NARAL Pro-Choice America. “They are extremely heavy-handed on this issue.”

And what do the Bishops have to say on the matter?

“By refusing to broaden the exemption, “in effect the president is saying that we have a year to figure out how to violate our consciences,” complained Cardinal-designate Timothy M. Dolan, archbishop of New York and president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops”

Sister Jane Marie Klein, chairwoman of the board of Franciscan Alliance Inc., a system of 13 Catholic hospitals, said, “This is nothing less than a direct attack on religion and 1st Amendment rights.”

When are my rights as  a women more important than the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops? When religious leaders begin to flaunt money, power, and the threats of “a direct attack on religion and 1st Amendment rights” it seems that we may have a problem on our hands. I have news for the Catholic Bishops and those who choose not to dignify women’s minds, bodies and souls: your religious “rights” end when my reproductive rights are threatened.  Read the rest of the article here…

Find more articles I’ve written here: http://www.rhrealitycheck.org/user/mycultlife

Can Women Pursue Men?

This is one of the number one Google searches that brings people to my site. I assume if you’re looking for this answer, you’ve got a guy on your mind that you want to pursue, but a pastor or spiritual leader who says it’s a no-go. Right?

To get deeper into this subject would require my writing a novel, or a book on dating but the long and short of it is, YES, women can pursue men. And NO, that doesn’t make you a whore, a Jezebel, an outlaw, a Smurf or any other thing your pastor might suggest.

I don’t want to be demeaning or rude, but here’s the “real talk”: If you’re wondering what your pastor will say about your pursuit of a guy, you’re in a sexist church. To go even further, if your pastor is inquiring about your dating life regularly and giving you advice, or suggestions that sound more like commands, you’re going to need to look for a new pastor or spiritual leader.

Just. Walk. Away.

If you’re pastor is that involved, you’re probably already in or heading toward an abusive relationship and your pastor is going to control much of your life and life choices. And no, he’s not qualified to do so. God isn’t saying he should. Your pastor (if he says that) is full of sh*t.

What you don’t know (or maybe you do, which is why you Googled your question) is that we live in a modern society where it’s perfectly okay to ask a guy out.

How can you pursue a guy? Here’s a few easy steps:

1. Start with the basics. Smile, flirt, touch his arm. It’s okay. You’re not a whore. You’re….FLIRTING. You’re showing him you’re interested and that’s okay to do. People aren’t mind readers. How else will he know you like him if you don’t show him a little hint of your interest?

2. Make the first move. Maybe you think he’s cute so you want to friend him on Facebook. Do it! Guys like confident girls. If he accepts, flirt a little bit. Message him or comment on a picture. Do you have his number? Text him or call him.

3. Make the second move. In order to get to know someone, you have to spend time with them, whether it’s through an email or face-to-face. Get to know him by talking to him and learning what he’s interested in. Remember, your interests are just as valid, so share what you like. If you’re not interested in exactly the same things, that’s okay. People can bond over different interests if they’re attracted to each other enough. And who knows? Maybe it’s going to be a match. Maybe not.

4. Move on, if necessary. Maybe there’s no match, and no chemistry. Oh well. The first (or fifteenth) guy you date doesn’t have to be your husband. There isn’t anything wrong with you if you can’t find a baby daddy on the second date. Trust me, it’s nothing to rush into. Get to know yourself before you rush into commitment and take a breather from the courtship route. It’s not the best way to do things, regardless of what your pastor teaches.

 


 

How has your Christian faith changed? A survey on deconversion for ex-Christians, Atheist, Agnostic, Spiritual, and Liberal Christians.

You are invited to participate in this survey on deconversion from Christianity, changes in Christian faith. The survey is particularly focused on (but not limited to) those who have previous experience with Christianity who now consider themselves non-Christian, non-religious, Spiritual, Agnostic, Atheist, or Liberal Christian.

How has your Christian faith changed? A survey on deconversion for ex-Christians, Atheist, Agnostic, Spiritual, and Liberal Christians.

 You are invited to participate in this survey on deconversion from Christianity, changes in Christian faith. The survey is particularly focused on (but not limited to) those who have previous experience with Christianity who now consider themselves non-Christian, non-religious, Spiritual, Agnostic, Atheist, or Liberal Christian. You will be asked to fill out your first and last name for validation purposes only. Your personal contact information you provide below will never be sold or marketed. By filling out this form, you are consenting to participate. You also agree to allow results to be used in and published in current and future research and writings by Lisa Kerr.
PRIVACY INFORMATION: If you agree, your identity will be made known in all written data resulting from the study. Otherwise, your individual privacy will be maintained in all published and written data resulting from the study. What this means? I will never use your real name unless you give me permission to do so below

A link to the survey has been provided here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dFVyVk9hSDRzZFkxbEhNVE51UnN3QXc6MQ

 

If you have questions about the study, the research or what the results will be used for, please feel free to email me at: mycultlife AT gmail DOT com.


Leaving Was the Hardest Part

When I was seventeen, I graduated high school and packed up to move to Phoenix, Arizona. I was joining Master’s Commission, a discipleship training program for college aged students. I was elated–it was my first time moving away from home and I loved the idea of dorm life and beginning my path into adulthood.

Master’s Commission wasn’t what I expected it to be, though. Instead of traveling around the world, acting at high school assemblies, and getting to know God better through studying the Bible, I spent several years in Master’s Commission as near slavery. You think I’m exaggerating? I know. I get that all the time. Seriously, though. I was forbidden to go off campus without permission from a discipleship leader, couldn’t date without the permission of my pastor, scrubbed toilets, washed dishes, did laundry (for the pastor), and home schooled the pastors children.

I was quickly branded the “good girl” and was put to work in the pastor’s home taking care of their children and often writing sermons for the pastors. I was a “pastors wife in training.” My senior pastor called me that, actually. He would walk in the house and call, “Woman of God! Did you go running today? We don’t want you to pack on the pounds like my wife here.” (His wife was a size two.)

They snatched me up to groom me into looking like them, teach me ministry etiquette, and give me face time with the pastor so I could “counsel” with him and make sure my decisions were ran through him before I did anything major in life. I raised their children, in part, because they wanted me to be a good mother when their chosen pastor came along to propose to me, and the other part of the plan was that they wouldn’t have to pay a nanny since I worked nearly for free. I planned the holiday church staff parties, decorated the pastors tables, and learned to cook the favorite cajun meals, so I could be the absolute hostess when my time came. I was encouraged to run every morning, and not to eat fried foods, because no one likes a fat pastors wife. My hair was to be grown out long, and blonde was the choice hair color. I was taught walk in stiletto heels, with a puffy chest, raised chin, and eye-brow just enough so I’d look sexy and mysterious.

It worked. The men wanted to be near me.

However, the pastor had his own set of ideas when it came to what men were suitable and unsuitable for me.

His dream was to plant 100 churches in 100 years. I was to be on the next shipment out of the church, with my groom-to-be, so that we could plant a church in X City in Louisiana.

The pastors dream was tripped up for a second when I told him that I’d like to do missions work, with or without a husband. I’d also like to get a college education. And while I was at it, I really liked this one guy, T, not this other guy, J.

All of this was a terrible shock to the pastor.

Why?

I don’t think any woman in his life had stood up to him. Ever.

From that point, I knew that I couldn’t live in Louisiana anymore, and I couldn’t attend that church. I’d have to do the hardest thing I’d ever done until that point: leave the friends I’d grown to love for years.

I knew what happened to those who left the group. They were never spoken to, and they were whispered about quietly (mostly about the “sin” they were partaking in, and how they’d “backslid” into temptation).

My group was a cult, you see. I had no idea I’d been doing ministry in a cult for several years. I thought I was serving God.

***

In retrospect, everything that I was taught in this group was either extreme or destructive to my personal well-being. Not only is it unbiblical; it’s unrepresentative of the idea and teachings of Christianity. The way the Bible was twisted into oppressing us was horribly abusive. We were given the idea that we were not only sinful in nature, but we were rebellious, and couldn’t trust our own hearts because they’d lead us astray from what the leader taught us. And what our leader taught us, was God’s voice of authority in our lives. If we departed from it, we were in sin.

It took years for me to figure out that this group was a cult. It took tears and many therapy sessions until I could admit that those pastors whom I loved so deeply, were harmful to me. I also realized that I didn’t have to be a pastors wife, if I didn’t want to. I wasn’t limited by what someone chose for my life.

Many of my readers ask if it was so bad there, why didn’t you just leave? That’s not a simple answer, for me.

In some ways, this group gave me a life I wouldn’t have had without it. I had “favor” with pastors who were nearly worshipped by tens of thousands of people. I got to act in small productions, and co-write sermons for young adult conferences that thousands of teens would see. I could spend some precious moments in the morning journaling and soaking in nature. And most importantly, I was surrounded by peers and leaders who loved me and supported me while I was in “God’s will.” They became like family as I obeyed my pastors dictates. Actually, they considered themselves my only family and kept me away from my real family.

After a few years, the dark side began to emerge. I was surrounded by friends who acted like clones of each other. Every woman started preparing herself for motherhood and life as a full-time ministry “support” to her future husband. We’d spend hours grooming, and playing dress up, so that we could parade out before the chosen young men who may be our future husbands. We snatched up babies in church, so we could be seen cradling, coddling, and cooing–hoping our future husband may see us and approve.

My ministry family began to dictate my every move. “Where’d you go?” was a seemingly innocent question posed by a pastors wife. When we answered, we were rebuked with a sinister, “You know you’re supposed to ask permission. What if something happened while you were gone and we needed you?”

Worse than that, was when I decided I wanted to go to college, travel as a missionary, and write. “I really see you as a pastors wife,” my pastor said one muggy Louisiana afternoon when I told him my future goals. “What do you think about Joshua or Tavares?” he casually asked when I told him I didn’t want to be a pastors wife. “I’ve been grooming them for you.”

My parents played a big role in me leaving. They were discouraged to visit due to our busy schedules and the fact that my pastors always kept me dizzyingly busy, but they came to visit me one weekend. After lunch with the pastor, my parents told me that they didn’t like the way he was speaking to me and for me, and they felt it was an unhealthy place for me to be. They wanted me to leave.

But, to me the leaving this group was the hardest thing I’d had to face.

You’re shocked, I know.

To leave on your own, meant three things.

1. If you were leaving without a church or ministry appointment, you were considered to be rebellious, disobedient, and otherwise a castaway.

2. If you left on your own, many of your peers and fellow leaders would ostracize you and drop their loyalty to you as a friend.

3. You’d be alone without the support of the hundreds of friends you’d made.

After being in this group for several years, I’d seen hundreds of people come and go. The ones who weren’t “blessed” were quickly forgotten. We were discouraged from talking to them and encouraged to talk badly about them. We were not to model ourselves after them, but to take note of the “wrong” they’d done, and discuss how they’d fallen “out of God’s will.”

I’ve come to find out that leaving meant I’d feel sense a feeling of being alone and an “outsider” so deeply, and sincerely. It meant I’d cry for days on end, wouldn’t be able to hold a steady job for years, and would develop social anxiety from living in the real world after being in a “bubble” for so many years. It would mean I’d need therapy; would have “issues”; and begin taking an anti-anxiety medication which certainly meant I “wasn’t trusting in Jesus” enough.

It meant I’d be crushed by having people I knew and loved reject me and leave me. I’d be grieving for the loss of so many relationships I’d spent years cultivating. It also meant I’d develop anger when they’d try to add me on www.myspace.com or www.facebook.com accounts, because they wouldn’t speak to me, but they’d follow my every move. They’d report back what I’d done, said, or pictures I’d posted and would judge me critically behind my back.

They’d be condescending with, “I’ll pray for you’s” and “I hope you’re doing well,” which began to mean that they thought I couldn’t succeed in life without them, and that they strongly disapproved of every decision I’d made without them.

It’d eventually mean that I felt like I didn’t belong anywhere. I was no longer accepted by those in the cult, but I was peculiar and odd to those who were in the normal world. For years, I felt misplaced. I felt misunderstood and troubled.

I began my Bachelor’s degree in 2005, after leaving Master’s Commission and Our Savior’s Church. I lived near my parents, and slowly developed a new set of friends. I entered a relationship with a therapist, who advised I cut out anyone from my life who was related to the Master’s Commission or Our Savior’s Church for my own mental and emotional well-being. I partially listened. 🙂 I took classes on Christian fundamentalism, and I read everything I had time for–classic literature, holocaust literature, essays on evolution, philosophy books, etc.

I started a new path to self-discovery. I went back to my childhood dreams of becoming a writer. I took up drawing, as I did when I was 10. I taught myself to paint, photography, and to make new friends.

I opened up to my parents and friends. I cried when I needed to. I wrote painful stories.

When I chose to pre-write for a memoir (in the form of a blog) of my days in the cult, I faced the fear, the anger and the hate from them. They were outraged. They said I was spiritually attacking their pastor, that I was acting un-Christian, that I was lying. They did everything they could to silence me. To take away my voice.

What I found by continuing to write was that I was helping people. I had no idea how many broken, hurt people were out there who felt alone like I had. Hundreds have come forward and emailed me in the past five months.

Thank You for Your Survey Answers (Cult & Destructive Ministries Survey)

I recently started working on a story about one girl in particular who reached out to me. She wanted to do a story about her group with some type of media coverage with similar intentions as I had when first starting this blog. I wanted people to know sort of the unscripted version, the unpretty side of my group. What went on behind the scenes and why no one talked about it. She had valid reasons in sharing her story, so we settled on doing a story for my blog as a starting point with discussion about how to reach out to larger media organizations with the story. Stories like these take a lot of research and fact checking on my end because abusive groups are great at covering up their abuse and attempt to discredit the victims in any way they can. Careful research and analysis is required in these stories.

Earlier in the week, I shared a Cult & Destructive Ministries survey with you all. I’m so excited about this. I’ll tell you why.

I’ve been getting emails from people over the past year and a half (since I started blogging) about their group and some of their stories. Some of you have amazing stories and they have been very heartbreaking and gut wrenching. To be quite honest, I went to hide after reading some of them. I cried. But I wasn’t sure if I could do anything to help. Each case is unique and each person is seeking something different by their email to me. Some, it seems, desire professional guidance to help them navigate through the tough road they have ahead. I am not a professional therapist and I have not found a professional I feel is qualified to help (who has the time). I do not endorse Christian therapists in aiding the recovery of cult survivors. Yet, not every secular therapist is a good fit for someone else. So, I’ve been at a loss on how to help the growing problem I see within my Inbox.

The gears have started turning this week, though, and I think I’m onto something that may begin to help.

I recently started working on a story about one girl in particular who reached out to me. She wanted to do a story about her group with some type of media coverage with similar intentions as I had when first starting this blog. I wanted people to know sort of the unscripted version, the unpretty side of my group. What went on behind the scenes and why no one talked about it. She had valid reasons in sharing her story, so we settled on doing a story for my blog as a starting point with discussion about how to reach out to larger media organizations with the story. I have some points of contact that I’m interested in sharing the story with but stories like these take a lot of research and fact checking on my end because abusive groups are great at covering up their abuse and attempt to discredit the victims in any way they can. Careful research and analysis is required in these stories.

After working with this girl, I then started thinking about all of you and I’m hoping with the responses I’ve received to the survey above, I can work on more stories that will shed the light on particularly abusive groups and spiritual leaders. My focus is on educating people about these groups and their traits and encouraging them to look for certain signs of abuse. Whether a group is a cult or not isn’t exactly my focus. My focus is on the psychological and physical trauma that people are living with, as a result of being oppressed by certain ideologies.

I hope to be in contact with some of you over the next few months to get quotes and some more avenues for research. For now, the information in the surveys will serve as a guide for research into these groups and a starting point for me. As I told my new friend, the girl I’m interviewing at the moment, I love to research. It’s my hobby. I’m excited about the GOOD that will come of it. 🙂

I love you all,

Lisa

Witchcraft

For years the stories of the witchcraft have intrigued me. Specifically the stories of colonial New England, because that’s what I’m most familiar with historically.

Why are these stories important to me?

I was accused of witchcraft when I was in Master’s Commission in Austin, TX. 

Pastor Nathan  asked one of his best friends and colleagues to come “fix” our Master’s Commission group. The man’s name was John Bates and he was from That Church in a very small town outside of Texas.

John Bates stood in front of our Master’s Commission group of staff and students telling us that he felt impressed that this was a really important problem–so important that he missed his son’s soccer game to be here.

Bates was asked to resolve a spiritual problem. The problem was vague–there weren’t any tangible issues I remember being pointed out. But one thing was certain, it was a problem of witchcraft and it was a problem of women rising up to emasculate the men in our group and take away their role of “leader” and “head of the ministry.”

We, the women of the group, were responsible for the problem.

We were responsible for “walking with the Devil.”

Many of us women were accused of being a Jezebel spirit, lending our ears to the Devil and listening to his commands which told us to overpower the men of the ministry.

This sounds creepy and Puritanical, but it’s all true and it all happened in the early 2000’s in South Texas.

Bates was convinced that there were certain women leaders amongst us who were practicing this rebellious witchcraft, so he admonished us to go to the front of the group and confess to Pastor Nathan  our sins.

There were about 4 or 5 women who went forward. I was one of them.

I didn’t feel I was a witch or a Jezebel, but I was convinced that I was evil beyond repair from Bates’ sermon.

When I confessed to Nathan , he said I wasn’t the one that God had spoken to him. God had given him names and he was waiting for those women to listen to God and come forward. I had nothing to do with the problem and I should go sit down.

So I sat. I watched Heather and Laurie and Mary come forward and I’m not sure if they were the “ones” that Nathan ‘s God had spoken to him about. Each of these women were normal women but the problem lied in Nathan ‘s idea of rebellion. Any rebellion was arbitrarily decided, based on a revolving set of rules. For each of these women, it could’ve been something as simple as them being quiet and just not talking about things as often as he wanted. Nathan  wanted us to confess our sins on a regular basis. If these women didn’t do so, they were suspect. If any woman showed a disagreeable attitude, it was assumed she was walking with the Devil. Our Master’s Commission group was like a military boot camp and most of us complained about the rules on a regular basis.

In Puritanical New England, witchcraft was an accusation that was primarily given to women. In some literature, these women were portrayed as “disagreeable women, at best aggressive and abrasive, at worst ill-tempered, quarrelsome and spiteful.” (Karlsen 118) In most cases, they had two main trespasses: “Challenges to the supremacy of God and challenges to prescribed gender arrangements.” (Karlsen 119)

Women in the mid-1600’s were demonized for their behavior, when it varied from the norm, coupled with a challenge to the religious leadership’s ideas of God and gender roles. Women were imprisoned, burned at the stake and publicly tried for these traits.

Yet, in my Christian experience, the demonization of women still goes on. It’s no surprise to anyone that gender roles are most strictly enforced in Christian society, particularly fundamentalist Christian society, which is rampant in the United States.

We’ve entered the twenty-first century, yet we can find associations in modern religious society’s treatment of women and colonial New England’s treatment of women. Isn’t this odd?

Mary Daly’s discussion of going beyond God the Father is an essential one, in order to change these violent ideals religions push onto women. Daly says that if “God is male, then male is God” presenting a patriarchal society that’s led by males, making women inferior.

If we can reconsider this idea of God, we might be able to rid the world of the religious violence toward women.

 

 

 

Inside Out

We are the ones. We are the ones who can see inside because we are outside. We can see when just minor tweaks have been made; small cosmetic changes. We know they’ve changed because we have spoken up; because we’re not silent. They’re not fooling us.

We are the ones. We are the ones who can see inside because we are outside. We can see when just minor tweaks have been made; small cosmetic changes. We know they’ve changed because we have spoken up; because we’re not silent. They’re not fooling us.

The questions still bother us, like a buzzing mosquito in our ear: Are they evil? Bad people? Malicious intent? The questions come and go bouncing like a buoy in the water, keeping us sane. They come to us because we’re outside now; we’re no longer inside. But they are still inside our heads telling us to be silent, that we’re rebellious, that we are listening to the Devil.

It’s simply not true. We’re outside but we struggle and then we gain ground and then we’re haunted by dreams of them–their faces, their teachings–and then we can finally breathe and rest in peace. And the cycle begins again.

Cult and Destructive Ministry Research Survey

As a reader of my blog, you are invited to participate in this survey on cults and destructive groups.

I decided to start recording some of the information from you all, because MANY of you have been so kind to email me about your group, but I didn’t have a way to centralize the data for research or to help anyone. Hopefully this will be a start of some good things to come.

As many of you know, I’m a writer. I write about my own experiences, but many of your stories are similar to mine. I’d love to use some of your stories in future books or articles, but first I need them to be filed away and organized. If you decided to participate, you MUST know this: If you agree, your identity will be made known in all written data resulting from the study. Otherwise, your individual privacy will be maintained in all published and written data resulting from the study. That’s just a fancy way of saying you choose whether you remain anonymous in any publication or whether I can use your name. I will NOT ever use your name without your consent. And I will never sell your name or email address to anyone. Ever.

So, if you’d like to participate, please visit the link here. Feel free to copy and paste the link on Facebook, Twitter or share on your own blogs.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEhKT1N2NS1tMEw2RkRGQjVlalVFVEE6MQ
If this link isn’t working please email me at: mycultlife AT gmail DOT com and I will send you the link.

And thanks in advance. Let’s work together to stop spiritual abuse and give voice to the victims of cults.

Why Full Disclosure is Needed from Politicians & Pastors on their Income

For years I’ve said politicians and pastors are similar. Romney pays approx. 15% taxes, whereas most middle class pay 30% because most of his income comes from investors. Pastors on the other hand have the luxury of hiding income in various avenues around their non-profit churches and ministries. When is a church or pastor every truly prodded to come out with fiscal detailed statements? I wonder what we’d uncover.

NPR aired a story on Mitt Romney this morning, Romney Says He Pays US Taxes_About 15 Percent. According to the story:

Romney told reporters he also received money from speechmaking before he announced his presidential candidacy early last year “but not very much.” He provided no details, but in his financial disclosure statement, released last August, he reported being paid $374,327.62 for such appearances for the 12 months ending last February.

Here’s the problem with Romney and other politicians: they don’t disclose what they earn, or they speak in vague terms like “not very much” to cover up what is truly a large amount of money.  My problem isn’t with Mitt Romney per se, but he’s a good illustration point. Romney has stated that he’ll disclose his income taxes in April, but until then, what is he hiding? Will he disclose his past 10 years of income or just 2011 taxes that may be modified to appear more favorable for voters?

There are similar tactics in place in churches. When asked how much a pastor earned, a full amount is never disclosed. Not to mention, pastors, like politicians earn money based on donor giving which they may not disclose to the public.

For years I’ve said politicians and pastors are similar. Romney pays approx. 15% taxes, whereas most middle class pay 30% because most of his income comes from investors. Pastors on the other hand have the luxury of hiding income in various avenues around their non-profit churches and ministries. When is a church or pastor every truly prodded to come out with fiscal detailed statements? I wonder what we’d uncover.

Romney says he won’t release taxes until April. If we can’t get a politician to release his taxes how will we be able to get a church, ministry or pastor to release theirs?

Being Untethered from Religion

“When I got untethered from the comfort of religion, it wasn’t a loss of faith for me, it was a discovery of self.” Brad Pitt

image

I’ve read good things about Brad and Angelina and always admired the amount of humanitarian work Angelina does. No matter how many people make fun of her for adopting babies, she has done some commendable work with the United Nations.

I’d also read somewhere that Brad and Angelina were not going to raise their children Christian, but were going to let them see the world and decide for themselves. They also were going to have multiple books of faith around, not just the Bible, for them to explore.

Reading Brad Pitt’s quote below did something for me-it articulated how I feel about being free from religion. It’s a very liberating feeling.

Cheers.

 

UPDATE: More on Brad Pitt’s religious views here.