Mercy Ministries Glossy Reputation–As Fake as Joyce Meyer’s Face

It’s clear from Mercy Ministries own website, that they aren’t treating women with licensed counselors or with accepted medical protocol despite what their lip service claims on their webpage. Just take a look at their newest post, Five More Graduates Celebrate Freedom!  This contradicts any of their PR. First of all, if a group was really concerned with healing debilitating disorders, would they make women ‘graduate’? What the fuck does that even mean? Speaking to dozens of survivors of Mercy Ministries, I can tell you that graduating is nothing but a “notch on the bedpost” for Nancy Alcorn. Another fuck, another dollar.  She just prostitutes young women out for her own paycheck. Six million dollars in donations isn’t too shabby. And would they use words like ‘freedom’? The answer is emphatically no.

Women go to Mercy Ministries simply because it’s free and because they have a glossy exterior of love and concern. They sell perfection, and in many cases, young, vulnerable women become so brainwashed that they truly believe Jesus (by proxy of Mercy) saved them from their issues or disorders permanently and they will never need help again. What’s sad about this is it sets up vulnerable women for defeat. When their mental illnesses or their eating disorders remain, they feel guilty because they were taught that their illnesses are a result of THEIR OWN SIN.

Like this “graduate” Suzanne, who thinks her bipolar disorder was a result of her sin. Don’t worry, folks…Jesus washed it away:

A woman who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

What Suzanne doesn’t know (yet) is that bipolar disorder isn’t cured by the Lord or by Mercy Ministries staff. Bipolar disorder can be treated with medical help, but it’s not gone because someone prayed it away or exorcised the demons of bipolar disorder away (yes, MM has a habit of exorcising demons and “generational curses” away). It’s easy to remain in denial when you are in a euphoric state of mind brought on by large crowds worshiping the work Nancy does, but when Suzanne leaves, will she remain “free”? The odds are that she won’t.

Suzanne’s story in her own words is below:

Before coming to Mercy, I lived a fake life. I tried to please everyone and became the type of person I thought they wanted. I had no relationship with Christ, so I struggled with addictions, self-destruction, depression and I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. I was desperate to cleanse my life of its confusion, but my disorder and past pain were overwhelming.
While I was searching for help, my mentors suggested Mercy Ministries. I then heard the testimony of a Mercy graduate at a local church. As I listened to the Mercy graduate, I knew I wanted her healing. Mercy seemed to be the key to success, so I applied and entered the program.

While at Mercy, God gave me the highest honor and adopted me into His family. He did the impossible and washed away all the sin and shame of my past. I learned to take on the mind of Christ, and through that renewal he brought me freedom, light, and hope. Today, I can laugh with no fear of the future.

Of course, the phrase “take on the mind of Christ” reminds me of Mercy Ministries financial supporter, Joyce Meyer, who penned the book Battlefield of the MindI remember my first year in Master’s Commission, I was introduced to Joyce Meyer through her speaking engagements that brought her to Phoenix First Assembly of God. Oddly enough, it was that year (1998, I think) that she spoke on stage of her face lift. I was so in awe of Joyce. Being an insider in Phoenix First Assembly of God, I saw her leave the stage and walk outside to where her private white Lincoln Towncar and driver were waiting to rush her off away from all the “little people.”

I was still so inspired by her ability to overcome her horrible past. I think most who are brought up in the evangelical world look to her as a hero because she came from such a troubled past and is so goddamned wealthy (televangelists parade their wealth as a sign of God’s blessing). But as much as I bought into her book Battlefield of the Mind and memorized scripture every single day, I was never able to conquer my own “negative thoughts” or thought patterns. Why? Simple. I suffer from depression and major depressive disorder at that. I share this because a) there is a stigma on mental illness and b) I don’t want a single young woman to think they’ve failed Jesus if they can’t “overcome” something biological with their Jesus-devotion. For me, there is a genetic component. It runs in the family and I feel with the right doctors and LICENSED therapists, it’s manageable, but like my good friend B says, “Getting well isn’t easy. It takes a lot of really hard work.” There are no miracles when it comes to disorders of the mind.

From the Amazon description of Battlefield of the Mind (emphasis my own)

Worry, doubt, confusion, depression, anger and feelings of condemnation: all these are attacks on the mind. If readers suffer from negative thoughts, they can take heart! Joyce Meyer has helped millions win these all-important battles. In her most popular bestseller ever, the beloved author and minister shows readers how to change their lives by changing their minds.
She teaches how to deal with thousands of thoughts that people think every day and how to focus the mind the way God thinks. And she shares the trials, tragedies, and ultimate victories from her own marriage, family, and ministry that led her to wondrous, life-transforming truth–and reveals her thoughts and feelings every step of the way.

What Joyce Meyer and Nancy Alcorn teach are lies, but further, they are destructive teachings which prey on the weak and disabled. Why? Money, my dears. Have you heard of Joyce Meyers six year investigation by the Senate? From CBS News,

CBS News has learned Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa, the ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, is investigating six prominent televangelist ministries for possible financial misconduct.

Letters were sent Monday to the ministries demanding that financial statements and records be turned over to the committee by December 6th.

According to Grassley’s office, the Iowa Republican is trying to determine whether or not these ministries are improperly using their tax-exempt status as churches to shield lavish lifestyles.

The six ministries identified as being under investigation by the committee are led by: Paula White, Joyce Meyer, Creflo Dollar, Eddie Long, Kenneth Copeland and Benny Hinn. Three of the six – Benny Hinn, Kenneth Copeland and Creflo Dollar – also sit on the Board of Regents for the Oral Roberts University.

A spokesperson for Joyce Meyer Ministries provided CBS News with an IRS letter to the ministry dated October 10, 2007, that stated: “We determined that you continue to qualify as an organization exempt from Federal income tax.” The letter could not be independently verified in time for this story. The ministry also pointed to audited financial statements for the last three years that are posted on the organization’s Web site.

OH SHIT, shake that ass ma, move it like a gypsy
Stop, woah, back it up, now let me see your hips SWING

Sorry, that was me doing a little dance of happiness over the amount of BULLSHIT Joyce Meyer had to give to her loyal zombies to brush that shit under the rug. Here’s their press release which really doesn’t say much except, We didn’t get caught, fools!

How women like Joyce Meyer and Nancy Alcorn can live with this amount of manipulation on their hands on a daily basis is beyond me. The money must be pretty sweet. Oh wait, it sure as hell IS sweet if the IRS is after you.

1 thought on “Mercy Ministries Glossy Reputation–As Fake as Joyce Meyer’s Face”

  1. Hi Lisa,

    Interesting post. It’s very sad when well-meaning (or not) people donate their hard-earned dollars to organizations like this. Organizations that thrive and survive on the ignorance and stupidity of others. If people really want to help the down and out, why not donate to a food bank? I hear they’re all in need of donations, especially this time of year when the weather is turning crappy.

    I admit that I held a similar mentality to MM for many years. I was taught to believe that my postpartum psychosis symptoms were actually flashbacks to the satanic rituals I endured when I was younger. At the time, no other explanation seemed feasible. I was ignorant, deluded and desperate. I was so brainwashed I went so far as to “evangelize” for the guru who was deluding me. In other words, I became complicit in his crimes.

    Remembering my own complicity and ignorance helps me to hold a semblance of compassion for those who are as deluded as I was.

    Whether Joyce Meyer and the others are knowingly deceiving people or are just ignorant pawns is hard to know. The guru I was a slave to really thought he was doing God’s work. He wasn’t trying to deceive me or anyone. He believed with all his being that he was a man of God, chosen by God to do this this special work. Granted he also had an ego as big as a train wreck but most of that manifested in reaction to people who weren’t “tracking” with him. He didn’t react well to criticism which should have been a red flag from day one but I really wanted to believe this guy had the answers for what was bothering me.

    We may have differing opinions on this but I believe God CAN heal this woman’s bi-polar. She may be healed now. Who knows? I would never be so presumptuous as to believe I know how God operates. What worries me though is that if this woman is not healed, she will blame herself and feel that she’s still living in sin. Or she’ll turn into a bitter person and walk away from God altogether.

    So much to think about…

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