Mercy Ministries Glossy Reputation–As Fake as Joyce Meyer’s Face

It’s clear from Mercy Ministries own website, that they aren’t treating women with licensed counselors or with accepted medical protocol despite what their lip service claims on their webpage. Just take a look at their newest post, Five More Graduates Celebrate Freedom!  This contradicts any of their PR. First of all, if a group was really concerned with healing debilitating disorders, would they make women ‘graduate’? What the fuck does that even mean? Speaking to dozens of survivors of Mercy Ministries, I can tell you that graduating is nothing but a “notch on the bedpost” for Nancy Alcorn. Another fuck, another dollar.  She just prostitutes young women out for her own paycheck. Six million dollars in donations isn’t too shabby. And would they use words like ‘freedom’? The answer is emphatically no.

Women go to Mercy Ministries simply because it’s free and because they have a glossy exterior of love and concern. They sell perfection, and in many cases, young, vulnerable women become so brainwashed that they truly believe Jesus (by proxy of Mercy) saved them from their issues or disorders permanently and they will never need help again. What’s sad about this is it sets up vulnerable women for defeat. When their mental illnesses or their eating disorders remain, they feel guilty because they were taught that their illnesses are a result of THEIR OWN SIN.

Like this “graduate” Suzanne, who thinks her bipolar disorder was a result of her sin. Don’t worry, folks…Jesus washed it away:

A woman who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

What Suzanne doesn’t know (yet) is that bipolar disorder isn’t cured by the Lord or by Mercy Ministries staff. Bipolar disorder can be treated with medical help, but it’s not gone because someone prayed it away or exorcised the demons of bipolar disorder away (yes, MM has a habit of exorcising demons and “generational curses” away). It’s easy to remain in denial when you are in a euphoric state of mind brought on by large crowds worshiping the work Nancy does, but when Suzanne leaves, will she remain “free”? The odds are that she won’t.

Suzanne’s story in her own words is below:

Before coming to Mercy, I lived a fake life. I tried to please everyone and became the type of person I thought they wanted. I had no relationship with Christ, so I struggled with addictions, self-destruction, depression and I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. I was desperate to cleanse my life of its confusion, but my disorder and past pain were overwhelming.
While I was searching for help, my mentors suggested Mercy Ministries. I then heard the testimony of a Mercy graduate at a local church. As I listened to the Mercy graduate, I knew I wanted her healing. Mercy seemed to be the key to success, so I applied and entered the program.

While at Mercy, God gave me the highest honor and adopted me into His family. He did the impossible and washed away all the sin and shame of my past. I learned to take on the mind of Christ, and through that renewal he brought me freedom, light, and hope. Today, I can laugh with no fear of the future.

Of course, the phrase “take on the mind of Christ” reminds me of Mercy Ministries financial supporter, Joyce Meyer, who penned the book Battlefield of the MindI remember my first year in Master’s Commission, I was introduced to Joyce Meyer through her speaking engagements that brought her to Phoenix First Assembly of God. Oddly enough, it was that year (1998, I think) that she spoke on stage of her face lift. I was so in awe of Joyce. Being an insider in Phoenix First Assembly of God, I saw her leave the stage and walk outside to where her private white Lincoln Towncar and driver were waiting to rush her off away from all the “little people.”

I was still so inspired by her ability to overcome her horrible past. I think most who are brought up in the evangelical world look to her as a hero because she came from such a troubled past and is so goddamned wealthy (televangelists parade their wealth as a sign of God’s blessing). But as much as I bought into her book Battlefield of the Mind and memorized scripture every single day, I was never able to conquer my own “negative thoughts” or thought patterns. Why? Simple. I suffer from depression and major depressive disorder at that. I share this because a) there is a stigma on mental illness and b) I don’t want a single young woman to think they’ve failed Jesus if they can’t “overcome” something biological with their Jesus-devotion. For me, there is a genetic component. It runs in the family and I feel with the right doctors and LICENSED therapists, it’s manageable, but like my good friend B says, “Getting well isn’t easy. It takes a lot of really hard work.” There are no miracles when it comes to disorders of the mind.

From the Amazon description of Battlefield of the Mind (emphasis my own)

Worry, doubt, confusion, depression, anger and feelings of condemnation: all these are attacks on the mind. If readers suffer from negative thoughts, they can take heart! Joyce Meyer has helped millions win these all-important battles. In her most popular bestseller ever, the beloved author and minister shows readers how to change their lives by changing their minds.
She teaches how to deal with thousands of thoughts that people think every day and how to focus the mind the way God thinks. And she shares the trials, tragedies, and ultimate victories from her own marriage, family, and ministry that led her to wondrous, life-transforming truth–and reveals her thoughts and feelings every step of the way.

What Joyce Meyer and Nancy Alcorn teach are lies, but further, they are destructive teachings which prey on the weak and disabled. Why? Money, my dears. Have you heard of Joyce Meyers six year investigation by the Senate? From CBS News,

CBS News has learned Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa, the ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, is investigating six prominent televangelist ministries for possible financial misconduct.

Letters were sent Monday to the ministries demanding that financial statements and records be turned over to the committee by December 6th.

According to Grassley’s office, the Iowa Republican is trying to determine whether or not these ministries are improperly using their tax-exempt status as churches to shield lavish lifestyles.

The six ministries identified as being under investigation by the committee are led by: Paula White, Joyce Meyer, Creflo Dollar, Eddie Long, Kenneth Copeland and Benny Hinn. Three of the six – Benny Hinn, Kenneth Copeland and Creflo Dollar – also sit on the Board of Regents for the Oral Roberts University.

A spokesperson for Joyce Meyer Ministries provided CBS News with an IRS letter to the ministry dated October 10, 2007, that stated: “We determined that you continue to qualify as an organization exempt from Federal income tax.” The letter could not be independently verified in time for this story. The ministry also pointed to audited financial statements for the last three years that are posted on the organization’s Web site.

OH SHIT, shake that ass ma, move it like a gypsy
Stop, woah, back it up, now let me see your hips SWING

Sorry, that was me doing a little dance of happiness over the amount of BULLSHIT Joyce Meyer had to give to her loyal zombies to brush that shit under the rug. Here’s their press release which really doesn’t say much except, We didn’t get caught, fools!

How women like Joyce Meyer and Nancy Alcorn can live with this amount of manipulation on their hands on a daily basis is beyond me. The money must be pretty sweet. Oh wait, it sure as hell IS sweet if the IRS is after you.

Gloria Jeans Coffee Supports Gay Conversion Program

[This article originally posted here at AfterEllen. We’re reposting here for educational purposes. Mercy Ministries has been continuing their abuse since 2008. It’s been rumored that Gloria Jeans coffee has ceased funding Mercy Ministries, but I do not have confirmation of that.  If you have any new information regarding this program, please email Lisa Kerr at mycultlife@gmail.com.]

I just want to bring this to everybody’s attention. Gloria Jeans is an international coffee chain akin to Starbucks. They are partnered closely with Mercy Ministries, a Christian-based (admittedly) anti-choice organization that also “treats” girls who struggle with eating disorders, self-harm, depression, etc. Gloria Jeans claims they are not closely linked and only count MM among many of a number of local charities that they support. However, the Fall Issue of the Mercy Ministires USA magazine (pp.4-5) contains an article about how closely the two are connected.

Here are some links about it:

Gloria Jean’s Coffees Under Fire

Ad Banned: The Price of Homophobia

Ex-gay Group Targets Aussie Lesbians

They Prayed to Cast Satan From My Body

As a former US resident I can attest that all the allegations are true, and that they count homosexuality as an illness brought on by “demonic oppression” and must be “cast out”. (No, I am not making this stuff up. I wish I were.)

Most of MM’s other corporate sponsors have pulled away from them, but through all of this Gloria Jeans maintains it’s plans to financially support Mercy Ministries. Please don’t give Gloria Jeans your business!

From the latest edition of MM online magazine:

“In addition to the fundraising weekends and money boxes on each Gloria Jean’s Coffee counter, each company employee is educated on the work and vision of Mercy Ministries.”

What is Mercy Ministries?

According to their website:

About Us
Mercy Ministries’ free-of-charge, voluntary, faith-based residential program serves young women from all socio-economic backgrounds, ages 13-28, who face a combination of life-controlling issues such as eating disorders, self-harm, drug and alcohol addictions, depression and unplanned pregnancy. Mercy also serves young women who have been physically and sexually abused, including victims of sex trafficking. Using proven methods, a holistic approach and professional counselors in a structured residential environment, Mercy has helped thousands of young women be restored to wholeness. Mercy’s goal is to help these young women find freedom from their issues and empower them to serve in their communities as productive citizens.

Mission:

Mercy Ministries exists to provide opportunities for young women to experience God’s unconditional love, forgiveness, and life-transforming power.

Vision:

Mercy Ministries is committed to being an effective and well-respected global organization dedicated to transforming lives of generations searching for truth and wholeness.

 

What makes Mercy Ministries different?

We believe freedom is possible!
We don’t teach methods of coping with life-controlling issues, we teach God’s unconditional love, forgiveness and life-transforming power. Our program gives young women the tools they need to break free! We apply Christian principles and teachings with proven methods and a professional counseling staff. Our approach to healing allows young women to permanently stop destructive cycles and prepares them to take hope out into their communities.

Our program is completely FREE OF CHARGE
We want our residents to know that we genuinely care. They can trust us because we are not making money off of their problems. We raise all the financial support for our programs through private funding.

We have seen thousands of lives transformed
Mercy Ministries International has helped over 3,000 residents in its nearly 30 years of operation. In a recent survey of former Mercy Ministries of America residents, 93 percent of respondents said Mercy Ministries “transformed their lives and restored their hope.” Time and time again we have seen girls who have no hope or will to live develop into strong, passionate leaders. God is using Mercy graduates to impact lives all over the world.

 

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What is Mercy Ministries behind the mask?

Mercy Ministries is a Nashville, Tennessee based group which was accused of misrepresenting their counseling and recovery services to young women in Australia in 2008. The misrepresentation in Australia was two-fold. First, they claimed their services were free but had the girls sign over their government checks. Second, the ministry claimed to be using licensed therapists and professional counseling methods.  In 2009, Mercy admitted their guilt in misrepresentation on both counts and paid back $120,000 of government aid it had wrongly taken from the girls who attended—in Australia.